2024 Saltin International Course in Exercise & Clinical Physiology

The Saltin International Graduate Course is a four-day intensive doctorate level course that brings together faculty and students from universities in Canada and Denmark. The course focuses on exercise and clinical physiology, integrating foundational knowledge with frontier research directions from basic science and applied approaches.

The 2024 course is a “joint venture” between three Danish universities (University of Southern Denmark, Aarhus University and the University of Copenhagen) and several universities in Canada, including the University of British Columbia Vancouver and the University of Ottawa.

Program

The biennial, integrative, research-based course covers basic and applied science topics on various physiological systems and extends to common clinical physiological applications. Thematic areas in physiology will range from subcellular signaling to organ function and systemic integration.

Download the full program.

Day 1
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Monday, August 19

8:00 – 8:45 AMBreakfast
8:45 – 9:00 AMWelcome
Niels Ørtenblad, Ylva Hellsten and Kristian Overgaard
9:00 – 9:40 AMGeneric Lecture
Chair: Robert Boushel

Presenting scientific findings: The art of the talk
Morten Zacho
9:40 – 10:00 AMCoffee break
10:00 AM – 12:00 PMMetabolic regulation in exercise and health
Chairs: David Wright and Jørgen Wojtaszewski

Mitochondria in health and disease
Mary-Ellen Harper

Mitochondria function in exercise and ageing
Henriette Pilegaard

IL6 as an energy allocator
Helga Ellingsgaard
12:00 – 1:00 PMLunch
1:00 – 3:00 PMInfluence of sex hormones on performance and adaptation to training
Chairs: Ylva Hellsten and Mary-Ellen Harper

Influence of sex hormones on sport performance and adaptation to training in females
Mette Hansen

Hyperandrogenism and the role of testosterone for physical performance in elite female athletes
Angelica Lindén Hirschberg

Sex-based differences in fuel storage and metabolism at rest and during exercise
Michaela Devries-Aboud
3:00 – 4:00 PMDiscussion Forum
Coffee break included
4:00 – 6:00 PMPoster session 1
Chairs: Joachim Nielsen and Yael Nossent; Mette Hansen and William Sheel
6:00 PM – 7:00 PMDinner
7:30 – 8:30 PMEvening Talk
Chair: Jørgen Wojtaszewski

Digesting snakes are a feast for integrative physiology
Tobias Wang
Day 2
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Tuesday, August 20

8:00 – 9:00 AMBreakfast
9:00 – 11:00 AMCouch conversation and discussion
11:00 – 11:20 AMCoffee break
11:20 AM – 12:00 PMGeneric lecture
Chair: Ylva Hellsten

Publishing in a world of metrics
Joachim Nielsen
12:00 – 1:00 PMLunch
1:00 – 2:20 PMDrug and exercise interactions
Chairs: Bente Klarlund Pedersen and Morten Hostrup

Effects of farmaka on training adaptations and metabolism
Flemming Dela

Glucokortikoider, exercise and connective tissue
Micheal Kjær

Influence of Antipsychotic drugs on exercise induced adaptations
David Wright
2:20 – 4:00 PMDiscussion Forum
Coffee break included
4:00 – 6:00 PMPoster session 2
6:00 – 7:00 PMDinner
7:30 – 8:30 PMEvening talk
Chair: Niels Ørtenblad

“All singing all dancing”
Coen Elemans
Day 3
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Wednesday, August 21

8:00 – 9:00 AMBreakfast
9:00 AM – 12:00 PMThe cardiovascular system
Chairs: Robert Boushel and Jørn W. Helge

Regulation of skeletal muscle microcirculation
Graham Fraser

Influence of respiratory work on blood flow distributing during exercise
Bill Sheel

20 min coffee break

Regulation and function of skeletal muscle capillaries
Ylva Hellsten

Small non-coding RNA’s and their modifications; molecular communicators in exercise induced adaptations in the cardiovascular system
Yael Nossent
12:00 – 1:00 PMLunch
1:00 – 4:00 PMMuscle function and E-C coupling
Chairs: Jørn W. Helge and Kristian Overgaard

Muscle ionic shifts and fatigue during whole body exercise in humans
Morten Hostrup

Experimental studies in muscle function using isolated muscles
Kristian Overgaard

20 min coffee break

Muscle activation and E-C coupling
Niels Ørtenblad

Do different subcellular glycogen pools serve different purposes
Joachim Nielsen
4:00 – 6:00 PMDiscussion Forum
6:00 – 7:00 PMDinner
7:30 – 8:30 PMEvening talk
Chair: Bente Klarlund Pedersen

Integrative perspectives of exercise physiology: The Bengt Saltin approach
Rob Boushel & Jerome Dempsey
Day 4
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Thursday, August 22

8:00 – 9:00 AMBreakfast
9:00 – 9:40 AMGeneric lecture
Chair: Kristian Overgaard

Turning a PhD project into medicine
Thomas Holm Pedersen
9:40 – 10:00 AMCoffee break
10:00 – 12:00 PMHow do we interpret and understand complex data? How to estimate activity level?
Chairs: Niels Ørtenblad and Flemming Dela

Using and interpreting the omics approach
Jørgen Wojtaszewski

Analytical strategies using large cohort studies
Mathias Ried-Larsen

Dense long-term monitoring of behavioural and biological data in free-living environments
Anders Grøntved
12:00 – 12:30 PMCourse evaluation and wrap up
12:30 – 1:00 PMLunch and departure

Course format and credits

The course will be a combination of faculty plenary lectures, student research presentations, discussion groups, and various informal faculty-student interactions that provide diverse learning modules for students. The program will cover 38 hours and is compiled of both generic and thematic lectures with 2 to 4 presentations within a given theme. Student participants will be given research pitch training and must provide short presentations of their projects during the course. In addition, they shall prepare a poster, outlining their research. The course is structured to form a foundational component of graduate study credits at Canadian universities and for 3.5 ECTS credits at Danish Universities.

Course objectives

  • To provide an innovative learning experience for graduate students through exposure to and interaction with an extensive group of internationally recognized scholars and student peers.
  • To gain exposure to diverse research perspectives and experimental approaches to enrich student learning.
  • To facilitate interactive discussion on cutting edge topics, explore approaches to stimulate creativity and novelty in research design and enhance research study impact.
  • To gain experience in formulating and communicating research proposals.
  • To foster the formation of research networks between scientists and institutions for the exploration of future academic research initiatives.
  • To participate in discussions on career paths and trajectories.
  • To gain experience presenting research to peers and scholars.

Course outcomes

Graduate students will have the unique opportunity to view leading presentations and discussions with scholars in the field of exercise physiology over a four-day period. Topics covered will include basic metabolic and endocrine research, through to clinical research and implementation.

Students will be exposed to state-of-the-art experimental approaches that may be implemented in their own research to enhance novelty and impact. The opportunity exists to connect with peers at national and international levels.

Course background

International Perspective

Canada and Scandinavia have strong cultural and business links, with Canada being one of the strongest growing export markets for Danish companies. The Canadian and Danish Trade Commissions have built extensive networks for knowledge exchange based on a shared value system with a continuing commitment to fruitful collaboration on many global issues including industry, culture, and the arctic. Canada shares a 3,000 km maritime border with Denmark (Greenland) as well as rich historic and cultural links between the Inuit populations on both sides of the border. Universities across Canada and Denmark are committed to the ideal of academic scholarship and to the development of an international perspective to broaden and enrich the educational quality and expand research innovation.

As part of university missions, students are encouraged to participate in international exchanges and internships, courses, and field schools. These opportunities foster appreciation of other perspectives, cultures, and exposure to new expertise as a part of excellence in university education. Equity, diversity, and responsibility to society are values upon which the mission of Canadian and Danish Universities is founded. International collaborations between Canada and Denmark have been active for close to a century and have developed an intellectual depth and high rates of research discovery. Notably, a rich tradition of scientific collaboration exists in the fields of physiology and exercise.

After receiving the Nobel Prize in 1920 for his work on the function of capillaries, August Krogh took an interest in the work of Frederick Banting and Charles Best on the glucose-lowering peptide insulin. On a trip to North America in 1922 August and his wife Marie who was diabetic, visited Banting’s lab at the University of Toronto. Upon return to Denmark Krogh was instrumental in the nomination of Banting & Macleod for the Nobel Prize in 1923. Krogh obtained a license for the protocol for insulin purification and began production upon his return to Copenhagen. Together with the Danish physician H. C. Hagedorn, Krogh then founded the Nordic Insulin Laboratory and the Nordisk Insulin Foundation which today constitute the company Novo Nordisk and the Novo Nordisk Foundation.

In 1909, Johannes Lindhard was appointed in the Faculty of Medicine to lead the study of Gymnastics as an academic discipline, and in 1917 the laboratory for the Theory of Gymnastics (the Copenhagen School) was formed in the Faculty of Science. Krogh and Lindhard pioneered research on the physiology of exercise with precise measurement of ventilation, heart rate and cardiac output and elucidated the mechanisms regulating these responses. Over 2–3 decades, they firmly established the field of exercise physiology and mentored the next generation of prolific researchers in the field of human integrative physiology, namely Erik Hohwü-Christensen, Erling Asmussen and Marius Nielsen referred to as the ‘three musketeers’. Following in their footsteps, the Swedish physiologist Bengt Saltin conducted research in exercise physiology at the August Krogh Institute, beginning with foundational work on oxygen uptake, extending to muscle bioenergetics and biochemistry, and the role of the circulation in the limits of exercise. Bengt was Director of The Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre that continued the legacy of the University of Copenhagen as a leading centre in the field internationally. Amongst many accomplishments, Saltin was awarded the August Krogh Prize, The Novo Nordisk Prize, and the International Olympic Prize. Bengt was a strong proponent of international collaboration. He was awarded 12 honorary doctorates- 3 from Canadian universities stemming from a rich history of research collaboration (>75 publications) with Canadian scientists. Bengt Saltin was an organizing member of the first International Graduate Courses held in Canada in 2010 and 2011, and owing to the positive review of these courses, he encouraged their continuation.

The Saltin International Graduate Course in Clinical and Exercise Physiologyextends the strong scientific lineage between Denmark and Canada. In the field of Exercise Physiology, both countries rank in the top tier internationally for scientific impact per capita. In the previous courses held in Canada and Denmark, faculty and students from 20 universities were represented.

Speakers, Chairs and Organizers

Anders Grøntved

Professor, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Angelica Lindén Hirschberg

Professor/Specialist Physician, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

Anne Yaël Nossent

Visiting Professor, The August Krogh Section for Human Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Bente Klarlund Pedersen

Professor and Centre Director, Centre for Physical Activity Research Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Coen P.H. Elemans

Professor, Department of Biology, Syddansk Universitet, Odense, Denmark

David Wright

Professor, Kinesiology, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Emil G. Toft

Course Secretary, Centre for Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Flemming Dela

Professor, Xlab, Centre for Healthy Aging, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Graham M. Fraser

Associate Professor, BioMedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada

Helga Ellingsgaard

Senior Researcher, Group Leader, PhD., Centre of Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Henriette Pilegaard

Professor, Cell Biology and Physiology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Inge Holm

Head of Section, Administration, Centre for Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Jerome A. Dempsey

Professor, Department of Sports Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA

Joachim Nielsen

Associate Professor, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Jørgen Wojtaszewski

Professor, The August Krogh Section for Molecular Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Jørn W. Helge

Professor, Xlab, Centre for Healthy Aging, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Kristian Overgaard

Professor, Department of Public Health – Sport Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Mary-Ellen Harper

Professor and Director, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, The Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

Matthias Ried-Larsen

Senior Researcher, Group Leader, PhD., Centre of Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Mette Hansen

Associate Professor, Department of Public Health – Sport Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Michael Kjær

Professor, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Michaela Devries-Aboud

Associate Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada

Morten Hostrup

Associate Professor, The August Krogh Section for Human Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Morten Zacho

External Associate Professor, University of Southern Denmark, and Senior Manager, Kompan Fitness Institute, Denmark

Niels Ørtenblad

Professor, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Robert Boushel

Professor and Director, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Terry Graham

Professor, Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Canada

Thomas Holm Pedersen

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Tobias Wang

Professor, Kinesiology, Faculty of Biology – Zoophysiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

William Sheel

Professor, School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Ylva Hellsten

Professor, The August Krogh Section for Human Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Location

Sandbjerg Gods,

Sandbjergvei 102

6400 Sønderborg

Denmark

Registration and fees

The program fee for 2024 is $1600 CAD. This covers the course fee, meals, room and board. Participants will be responsible for organizing their own airfares and local travel.

Canadian participants can download and fill out the application form below. Please email the form to saltincourse.kin@ubc.ca by February 15, 2024.

The course will accommodate 15 Canadian students. Registrants will be notified of acceptance to the course by the end of January 2024.

Danish participants can see the CFAS website for registration details.

Contact

Dr. Robert Boushel, Director

School of Kinesiology

War Memorial Gymnasium

210-6081 University Boulevard

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1

Saltincourse.kin@ubc.ca