Upper-Level Requirements

Upper-level coursework lets you customize your academic journey based on your unique interests and goals. In addition to meeting the requirements of your chosen stream, you can enhance your academic experience by choosing complementary upper-level KIN electives. These electives act as a canvas for exploring your academic passions, enabling you to delve deeper into the subjects that interest you the most.

Understanding KIN Course Codes

The last two digits of each KIN course code indicates the thematic area.

BKIN students must complete a minimum of 48 credits at the upper-level (300/400-level) throughout Year 3 and Year 4. Registering in the right set of KIN courses at the upper-level is easier when you understand how KIN course codes are numbered.

A total of 36 credits of upper-level KIN courses are required:

  • 21 credits of stream-specific KIN courses coming from five thematic areas: Neuromechanics, Systems Biology, Leadership Education, Psychology of Movement, and Sociocultural Studies.
  • 15 credits of upper-level KIN electives fulfilled by additional coursework in any of the five thematic areas, or Advanced Seminars, Work-Integrated Learning, Directed Studies, or Undergraduate Research Experience courses.

Keep in mind that a further 12 credits of upper-level electives in KIN or non-KIN coursework is required in order to meet the requirement of 48 upper-level credits in total needed to graduate.

Year 3

Promotion to Year 3 is based on the successful completion of 48 credits in total, including all 100- and 200-level core KIN requirements.

In your third year, you should aim to plan a balanced schedule that includes a mix of stream-specific courses, upper-level KIN electives (indicated as ‘UL’), as well as general electives (KIN or non-KIN) balanced across both terms. The proposed course sequence below provides a template that students who aspire to graduate in four years can use to structure their third year.

Stream-Specific KIN

UL KINStream Specific3 credits
UL KINStream Specific3 credits
UL KINStream Specific3 credits

KIN Electives

UL KINNon-Stream Specific3 credits
UL KINNon-Stream Specific3 credits
UL KINNon-Stream Specific3 credits

*Upper-level KIN electives can include:

  • Advanced Seminars
  • Work-integrated Learning
  • Directed Studies & Research

General Electives

ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits
ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits
ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits
ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits

*Minimum of 48 credits at the upper-level required throughout Year 3 and Year 4.

Year 4

Promotion to Year 4 is based on the successful completion of 78 credits in total.

As your approach your final year, you should pay close attention to the specific credit requirements for stream-specific courses (21 credits), upper-level KIN electives (15 credits), and general elective requirements.

Stream-Specific KIN

UL KINStream Specific3 credits
UL KINStream Specific3 credits
UL KINStream Specific3 credits
UL KINStream Specific3 credits

KIN Electives

UL KINNon-Stream Specific3 credits
UL KINNon-Stream Specific3 credits

*Upper-level KIN electives can include:

  • Advanced Seminars
  • Work-integrated Learning
  • Directed Studies & Research

General Electives

ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits
ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits
ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits
ElectiveAny course, any level3 credits

*Minimum of 48 credits at the upper-level required throughout Year 3 and Year 4.

Stream-Specific KIN Courses

Streams within the BKIN degree program are options that serve as specialized pathways, allowing you to focus your studies on specific areas of interest within the field of Kinesiology. Each stream offers a cohesive set of courses, helping you develop specialized knowledge and skills that align with your desired career paths. Over the course of your 3rd and 4th year, you must complete a minimum of 21 credits of upper-level lecture/lab coursework from specific thematic areas. These stream-specific courses should be spread out across both years, alongside other KIN and non-KIN electives.

Avoid overthinking your choice of stream and instead prioritize following your passions and what sorts of courses interest you the most. Keep in mind that your stream is not explicitly listed on your diploma upon graduation; it only appears on your academic transcript. Additionally, regardless of your chosen stream, you can apply to any graduate program after completing your BKIN as long as you fulfill the required prerequisites for that specific program.

Neuromechanical and Physiological Sciences

The NPSC stream focuses on understanding the complexities of human anatomy and the processes that control motion. This exploration covers physiological, neural, mechanical, and behavioral elements, highlighting how they interact. Moreover, the curriculum examines how factors such as physical activity, aging, and disease affect these elements. To fulfill the NPSC stream requirements, students must complete 21 credits of upper-level KIN courses in the following thematic areas:

Social and Behavioural Sciences

The SBSC stream emphasizes investigating the psychosocial, historical, and cultural aspects of sport, physical activity, and health behavior. This analysis extends to comprehending their effects on both individuals and societies. To complete the SBSC stream requirements, students must complete 21 credits of upper-level KIN courses in the following thematic areas:

Multidisciplinary Science

The MDSC stream offers flexibility in designing your own program of study through course selections from each of the 5 thematic areas. This approach enables the creation of a comprehensive, cross-disciplinary curriculum. To complete the MDSC stream requirements, students must complete a combination of 21 credits of upper-level KIN courses: including 2 courses in 3 out of the 5 themes offered, as well as 1 course from either of the remaining 2 lists:

Upper-Level KIN Electives

In addition to fulfilling the 21 credits required for your chosen stream, you must also complete an additional 15 credits of general upper-level KIN electives. While you can opt to take additional lecture/lab courses from any of the 5 thematic areas above, we highly encourage you to consider exploring some of the dynamic, applied, and research-focused coursework options below. These enriching opportunities will not only enhance your BKIN degree but also help you develop invaluable skills and experiences for your future endeavors.

Advanced Seminars

Seminars are specialized and smaller-sized classes, which provide an in-depth exploration of emerging topics in Kinesiology, ranging from cutting-edge research to contemporary issues. In this setting, active engagement, discussions, and collaborative projects are encouraged, fostering critical thinking and research skills. When planning ahead for registration in future terms, keep an eye out for Advanced Seminars indicated with a suffix, e.g. KIN 482A. There is no application required to register in an Advanced Seminar course, and upper-year students can simply enroll in these courses during the registration period just like any other course.

Neuromechanics

KIN 482 E_001 Advanced Seminar in Neuromechanics (Term 1)

Theme: Programming and Data Science for Kinesiology
Instructor: Hyosub Kim
Description: Gain hands-on experience with learning to how program. Students will learn how to think algorithmically to process, visualize, and analyze data related to all types of research questions. This course will provide a solid foundation in core computing and data science skills. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up).  Students interested in this section should strongly consider taking KIN 482 E_001 with Dr. Kim in term 1 first Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Kim at: hyosub.kim@ubc.ca

KIN 482 D_002 Advanced Seminar in Neuromechanics (Term 2)

Theme: Computational Modeling of Human Sensori-motor Control and Learning
Instructor: Hyosub Kim
Description: Computational modeling has been central to many recent advances in our fundamental understanding of human movement. Through a combination of lectures, readings, and hands-on tutorials, this course provides students with an intuitive, yet rigorous, introduction to computational modeling of sensorimotor control and learning. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Kim at: hyosub.kim@ubc.ca

KIN 482 F_002 Advanced Seminar in Neuromechanics (Term 2)

Theme: Occupational Biomechanics
Instructor: Kayla Fewster
Description: This course will provide students with knowledge to reduce the risk of injury in occupations. An emphasis will be placed on reducing work-related low back and upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Students will learn how to identify injury risk factors in the workplace, understand injury mechanisms, and complete quantitative assessments of injury risk. In addition, the course will cover the development of intervention strategies to mitigate future injury risks once an injury risk is identified. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Fewster at: kayla.fewster@ubc.ca

Psychology of Movement

KIN 486 A_001 – Advanced Seminar in Psychology of Movement (Term 1)

Theme: Psychology of Movement
Instructor: Mark Beauchamp
Description: Topics examines the application of psychology to understanding and supporting healthy sport, physical activity, and health behaviors. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Beauchamp at: mark.beauchamp@ubc.ca

KIN 486 C_002 Advanced Seminar in Psychology of Movement (Term 2)

Theme: The Psychology of Team Effectiveness
Instructor: Desmond McEwan
Description: Within sport and other contexts that demand high performance, humans work together as part of teams. What makes teams effective? Why do some teams flourish but others flounder? Covering a range of interpersonal and group-level constructs, this course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to answer these types of questions. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up).  KIN 205 Research Methods is highly recommended. Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. McEwan at: desmond.mcewan@ubc.ca

Sociocultural Studies

KIN 487 B_001 Advanced Seminar in Sociocultural Studies (Term 2)

Theme: Hockey in Canadian Society, unofficial title “Hockey Night in Canada”
Instructor: Moss Norman
Description: This course examines historical and contemporary issues in Canadian society through the lens of ice hockey.  The course explores the deep and symbiotic relationship between the nation and the game and will use an intersectional lens to understand how gender, sexuality, race, social class, (dis)ability, and geographical location are implicated in the construction of what is commonly referred to as “our game”.  This course is organized as a seminar class and will incorporate experiential learning activities. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Norman at: moss.norman@ubc.ca

KIN 487 D_002 Advanced Seminar in Sociocultural Studies (Term 2)

Theme: Kinesiology, Health, and Climate Justice
Instructor: Liv Yoon
Description: This course explores the unique insights and creative approaches that kinesiology can offer around understanding and responding to the climate crisis.  Recognizing that climate change manifests on individual bodies but with social patterns, this course explores 1) how kinesiology broadens understandings of the body and health that is essential to grasp the wide-sweeping yet uneven impacts of climate change; and 2) examples of climate, health and justice connections informed by this understanding. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Yoon at: liv.yoon@ubc.ca

Systems Biology

KIN 483 M_001 Advanced Seminar in Systems Biology, Exercise and Health (Term 1)

Theme: Professional Practice in Kinesiology
Instructor: Jasmin Ma
Description: This course offers students an exploration of professional practice in Kinesiology, encompassing key concepts such as scope of practice, clinical communication skills, professional ethics, shared decision- making, inter-professional care, and evidence-informed practice. Through problem-based and case- based learning methodologies, students will work together to understand the inter-professional, collaborative approach to client care, fostering skills crucial for effective teamwork in real-world settings.Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Ma at: jasmin.ma@ubc.ca

Indigenous Sport & Physical Activity

KIN 484 B_001 Advanced Seminar in Indigenous Sport, Physical Activity and Health (Term 1)

Theme: Indigenous Approaches to Sport and Exercise Medicine
Instructor: Darren Warburton
Description: This course is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the lived and shared experiences of Indigenous peoples in sports and exercise medicine settings. This course will incorporate Indigenous ways of understanding and doing taking a strengths-based approach to health, wellness, and sport performance. Key topics include elite sport performance, healthy ageing, and chronic disease prevention and treatment. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Warburton at: darren.warburton@ubc.ca

KIN 484 A_002 Advanced Seminar in Indigenous Sport, Physical Activity and Health (Term 2)

Theme: Restoring Wellness Through Indigenous Land-Based Practices
Instructor: Janice Forsyth
Description: How can Indigenous physical practices tied to the land help restore Indigenous wellness in Canada? This course will help students ‘think through’ some of the dominant theoretical and practical challenges that question presents. To do this, we will examine how settler colonialism altered Indigenous physical practices and concepts of wellness through the 19th and 20th century and consider how Indigenous people and their communities are reclaiming and reengaging with physical culture and land-based practices to restore their overall sense of wellbeing in the 21st century. Open to all BKIN students with class standing 3 and above (year 3 and up). Questions about this course section should be directed to Dr. Forsyth at: janice.forsyth@ubc.ca

Work-Integrated Learning

Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) courses are an exciting opportunity for students to gain practical experience while earning academic credit toward their BKIN degree. Available exclusively to BKIN students, these upper-level courses integrate class meetings, hands-on experience, and independent learning activities. WIL is designed to foster direct experience, reflection, critical analysis, and experimentation, allowing students to connect academic learning with real-world applications.

Students can take a maximum of two WIL courses, accumulating up to 9 credits, which count as KIN upper-level elective courses. Grading is on a Pass/Fail scale, requiring a final grade of 70% or higher to receive ‘Credit’ (pass). To enroll, students need to apply during the application period, with admissions being broad-based and course-dependent. GPA is not a primary consideration, but applicants must be in good academic standing with a sessional average of 60% or greater and have failed no more than 6 credits in their degree. Faculty members facilitating WIL courses in the subsequent Winter session make offers in advance each Spring, allowing students to plan their Winter session course registration around their WIL schedule.

Directed Studies (KIN 490)

KIN 490 offers students in the field of Kinesiology a unique opportunity to engage in a 3-credit, student-led, independent research endeavor. This course, known as a Directed Study, allows students to delve deeply into a specific area of interest within the realm of Kinesiology under the guidance of a faculty member. Directed Studies serve as a platform for students to focus on a particular research topic or collaborate with a faculty mentor to explore a chosen area in greater detail.

To initiate a Directed Study, students are responsible for approaching a faculty supervisor who would be willing to oversee their research project. Together, the student and the faculty supervisor collaborate to develop a comprehensive proposal outlining the objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes of the research project.

Directed Studies are structured as 3-credit courses, and students have the option to pursue up to a maximum of 6 credits by enrolling in two Directed Study courses. These credits count towards the student’s upper-level KIN elective requirement, providing valuable academic recognition for their independent research efforts.

Undergraduate Research Experience (KIN 492)

KIN 492 represents a substantial opportunity for undergraduate students in Kinesiology, providing a comprehensive 6-credit Undergraduate Research Experience. Tailored for students in their third or fourth year of study, this course empowers participants to immerse themselves in independent research within the realm of Kinesiology, all under the close guidance of a dedicated faculty member from the KIN department.

The scope of KIN 492 is wide-ranging, encompassing various facets of the research process. Participants engage in original data collection, design and execute experimental or analytical research projects, conduct in-depth literature reviews, and ultimately synthesize their findings into a comprehensive written thesis. This multifaceted approach ensures that students gain hands-on experience in every aspect of the research endeavor, from conceptualization to dissemination of results.

Given the depth and complexity of the research involved, students enrolled in KIN 492 are expected to commit a substantial amount of time to their projects. Typically, this translates to approximately 120 hours per term dedicated solely to research activities. Moreover, regular meetings with their designated faculty supervisor are integral to the process, providing opportunities for feedback, guidance, and troubleshooting throughout the duration of the project.